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A Look at Roofing Options

When my wife and I bought our home in 2015, one of the things we wanted to know about, as may do, is the condition of the roof. There is nothing more frustrating than making a major home purchase and then finding out that you have to immediately pump thousands of dollars into it because something wasn't in a good, usable condition!

Of course, there are property disclosures that help us avoid that scenario, and those are helpful. But when it comes to your roof, even if it's in great condition today, one good hail or wind storm could potentially change that! Even without that kind of misfortune, your roof takes a beating much like the skin on your hands. Every day it takes the full force of the elements, so eventually it will come to the point of needing to be updated, maintained, or replaced.

That happened to a neighbor this past fall. When it did a group of men showed up and did something I'd never seen before... they put a metal roof on the house! Working at a church, I was familiar with this as a commercial product, but until then had never considered it on a residential unit. But, given the right circumstances, it could make a lot of sense!

Well, with that in mind, I went on a little fact-finding mission and came across this article from the folks at Allgood that I wanted to share with you. It's great info about the different types of materials you can get for your roofing needs. The original article appears here:
https://www.myallgoodhome.com/roofing-services/types-of-roofing.html

My sharing this information is not an endorsement of the company, it is just good information!

-DK

Different Types of Roofing Materials


Whether you are installing a new roof on a new house or replacing an older roof that is no longer doing its job, there are many choices in terms of the types of roofing materials available. Some of the different options include asphalt shingles, tile roofing, metal roofing and more.
Increase home value and protect what's inside with a long-lasting roof

Factors that determine what type of roofing is best include the slope and complexity of the roof, as well as the style of the house, local climate and the cost of different roofing options.

Asphalt & asphalt fiberglass shingles

Asphalt Shingles
Manufacturers have created asphalt shingles that imitate the look of wood and slate.
Although these terms are used interchangeably, most roof shingles used today are technically known as asphalt fiberglass shingles. The fiberglass mat embedded in the shingle provides an extra measure of strength and tear resistance.
These shingles are the most popular type of roofing for sloped roofs because they're affordable, easy to install, durable, and available in a wide variety of colors. Premium grades of "laminated" asphalt fiberglass shingles are typically warrantied for 50 years.

Rubber roofing

Rubber Roofing
Rubber membrane roofs are often used to seal flat roofs over garages and porches. Credit: EPDM Roofing Association
Although rubber has been around for a long time, rubber roofing is fairly new. That's because it's taken a great deal of chemistry research to develop a thin rubber membrane with the durability and waterproof qualities required of a roofing material. Rubber roofing is sometimes referred to as EPDM roofing. EPDM is an abbreviation for ethylene propylene diene monomer, the highly engineered compound used to manufacture most types of rubber roofing. Rubber roofing is used primarily on flat or low-slop roofs in both commercial and residential buildings.
A "membrane roof" usually refers to a rubber or EPDM roof that is installed in a flat roof or a low-slope application. Many commercial buildings have membrane roofs; few houses do.

Flat roofing

Greater Cincinnati's flat roof contractor
Because any flat roof is inherently prone to leaking, it’s important to hire skilled installers whenever flat roofing is repaired, replaced or installed.
This roofing category is often grouped with “low-slope” roofing because many of the roofing treatments are the same. The most common flat-roofing materials used on residential and commercial buildings today include single-membrane systems like EPDM or rubber roofing, thermo-polyolefin (TPO) roofing and PVC roofing. Metal roofing is sometimes used on low-slope roofs, but not on flat roofs.
High-density Spray Polyurethane Foam (SPF) roofing is a system that coats the roof with a continuous layer of foam insulation that can also serve as the finished roof surface (as long as a protective coating is applied over the foam).

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