Skip to main content

The Question Of Tragedy

There is a lot of tragedy in this world. As a Pastor, I've seen a great deal of it up close. 
  • Children who die of SIDS
  • Mothers taken away from their families by cancer
  • A Teenager gone to a drunk driver
  • The grandparent lost to dementia
  • The national mourning after a mass shooting in another school
  • The person stunned coming home to divorce papers and an empty closet

Often, when these things happen people respond in one of three ways:
  1. They break down emotionally (becoming depressed, often)
  2. They lash out in anger (doing destructive things like using illegal drugs or drinking heavily)
  3. They look for a reason and ask 'WHY?'

Sadly, we know the consequences of the first two actions lead to more pain. But even more sadly, often the third option does as well. Usually, it's because we ask the question of the wrong people or from the wrong perspective, and end up getting the wrong answers.

For instance, last summer I traveled to conduct a funeral for a woman who had been my secretary years before. She had struggled with cancer for the better part of a decade and finally passed away from complications that came from the treatments she'd endured. She was a woman of faith and believed in Jesus, heaven, and the Bible. She also left behind a husband, teenage son, and stepdaughter.

As I met with family and loved ones before the service, I kept hearing well-meaning individuals rationalizing her death by saying things like "God needed another angel." What they were doing was trying to state 'why' without asking the question. The problem was, they were neither correct or helpful!

Think about it:
If you are 13 years old and just lost your mom, does it make you feel better about her being gone to be told God took her?

Also... does it make you feel very good about God to be told that He took her?

"What a Bully!" would be my viewpoint of a God like that.

Thankfully, that is nothing like the nature of the God I serve. It is not how He operates or conducts business. It isn't theologically correct, either, for many reasons. (One, of course, is that we don't become angels when we die...but that's another point entirely!)


But IF God didn't need another angel, then when we've lost a loved one tragically, what is the point? If He isn't a bully in the sky or an uncaring old man asleep at the wheel of life (which are common things I've heard from people who usually have been told several times when they've lost loved ones that 'God needed them more than you do') what is the point of our tragedy?

To help explain it, I am going to quote an article from a great website called Got Questions (linked here). They state it much better than I ever could. I pray this soothes the hearts of those hurting and helps give correct perspective to those who have been told the wrong things for so long.


Question: "Is there meaning in tragedy?"

Answer: 
When tragedy strikes, it is common for people to ask, “What does this mean?” When we witness some disaster or mass murder, there is a natural feeling that what has happened should not have happened. This innate sense of “wrongness” is a clue to meaning in these events. When we look to find meaning in tragedy, we must have the right perspective. We need to approach the question in a way that allows for a coherent answer, and this is only possible through a Christian worldview. Because God instills meaning into every moment and event in history, through Him we can begin to find meaning in suffering. The nature of this world lends itself to tragic events. Fortunately, God speaks to us, so that we can find not only meaning, but salvation and relief from the sufferings of the world.

When studying physical motion, it is crucial to understand perspective. Speed and acceleration are only meaningful in relation to some other object; this object is the reference point. The way in which the reference point moves affects our perception. The same is true in our sense of right and wrong. For concepts of good, bad, right, wrong, or tragedy to be meaningful, they have to be anchored to a reference point that does not change or move. The only valid reference point for these issues is God. The very fact that we consider a mass murder wrong strongly supports the idea of God as the reference point for our sense of good and evil. Without God, even the events we consider the most tragic are no more meaningful than anything else. We have to understand the nature of this world and our relationship to God in order to draw any meaning at all from the things we see.

God infuses every moment and every event with meaning and gives us confidence that He understands what we are going through. When Jesus instituted communion, He tied the past, present, and future together. 1 Corinthians 11:26 says, “For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup (the present), you proclaim the Lord's death (the past) until He comes (the future).” God’s knowledge of all events means nothing is insignificant to Him. If God knows when a sparrow falls, He certainly knows when we face tragedy (Matthew 10:29-31). In fact, God assured us that we would face trouble in this world (John 16:33) and that He has experienced our struggles personally (Hebrews 2:14-18Hebrews 4:15).

While we understand that God has sovereign control over all things, it is important to remember that God is not the source of tragedy. The vast majority of human suffering is caused by sin, all too often the sin of other people. For instance, a mass murder is the fault of the murderer disobeying the moral law of God (Exodus 20:13Romans 1:18-21). When we look to find meaning in such an event, we have to understand why this world is the way it is. The hardship of this world was originally caused by mankind’s sin (Romans 5:12), which is always a matter of choice (1 Corinthians 10:13). While God is perfectly capable of stopping tragedies before they begin, sometimes He chooses not to. While we may not know why, we do know that He is perfect, just, and holy, and so is His will. Also, the suffering we experience in this world does three things. It leads us to seek God, it develops our spiritual strength, and it increases our desire for heaven (Romans 8:18-25James 1:2-3Titus 2:131 Peter 1:7).

In the garden of Eden, God spoke to Adam and communicated in clear and direct ways, not in abstract concepts. God speaks to us today in the same way. In some ways, this is the most important meaning to be found in any tragedy. Tragic events demonstrate much of their meaning in the way we react to them. C.S. Lewis said, “God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains. It is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.” This does not mean that God causes tragedy, but that He uses our reaction to tragedy to speak to us.

Tragic events remind us not only that we live in an imperfect and fallen world, but that there is a God who loves us and wants something better for us than the world has to offer.







Comments

Popular posts from this blog

5 Fights Couples Have When Buying a House

When my wife and I bought our home in the Northern Kentucky area, it was quite an experience. We had a great Realtor® with whom I am now privileged to work. I can only imagine the things he must have thought about us, showing up to look at houses with our two young boys, talking about if a room was big enough...what was that smell...why would they put the switch over here...

Ah, those were the days!

Thankfully, we didn't actually fight (that I remember) about anything considering a house. We both had a concept together of what we wanted, and a price range. And outside of those things, I didn't care as long as she was happy. No really, I didn't! As long as I could have air conditioning and hot water, I was good!

However, that is not the experience everyone has.

Today, I am actually going to share a link that will take you to Realtor.com. The article was written earlier this year by Stephanie Barth, a writer, and contributor to several publications. She took this concept of…

When The Neighbors Don't Care

A home that isn't being maintained like others in the neighborhood can negatively affect your visual sense of appeal and in some extreme cases, even affect property values. It might be an overgrown yard, a fence in need of repair, excessive noise, unruly pets, paint peeling on the home or even a car or boat parked in front of the home that hasn't moved in weeks.

Most people want to be good neighbors and may be willing to correct an issue once it is brought to their attention. A practical, but possibly confrontational, solution is to contact the responsible person and describe your perception of the issue. However, they may not always agree with the same urgency and it might be necessary to seek other remedies.


An owner-occupant may be more sympathetic to the neighbors and willing to correct the issue. If you think the home might be a rental property, check with the county tax records to identify the owner. They may be unaware of the situation and welcome the…

Don't Let A Killer In

Carbon monoxide is a silent killer you don't want in your home but because it is colorless and odorless; you may not even be aware the deadly condition exists. The Center for Disease Control says more than 400 people in the U.S. die annually from carbon monoxide poisoning and over 10,000 require medical treatment each year.


Unmaintained furnaces, water heaters and appliances can produce the deadly gas. In addition, other sources could be leaking chimneys, unvented kerosene or gas space heaters or exhaust from cars or trucks operating in an attached garage.
The Environmental Protection Agency suggests the following to reduce exposure in the home:
Keep gas appliances properly adjustedInstall and use an exhaust fan vented to the outdoors over gas stovesOpen flues when fireplaces are in useDo not idle car inside garageHave a trained professional inspect, clean and tune-up central heating systems annually Headaches, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and feelings of weakness or fat…